--. SHERLOCK is actually a GIRL'S NAME .--
I'm a sherlockian from CHILE, so I'm clueing for looks too. But english is not my first language, so will be a lot of mistakes here.
Reblogged from obscure-affection  1,416 notes

violethuntress:

sherhclmes:

s  h  e  r  l  o   c  k   i s    g  a  a  a  a   y  x ]

Why aren’t more people talking about this? Why did I never notice this quotation before? It seems legit, right?

I actually do wonder, in a non-rhetorical sort of way, what conclusion they came to. Because the next episode after series 1 is ASiB, and, well, it’s definitely not obvious from that episode either, even though the episode brings up more explicitly than any other.

Anyway, interesting quote that I didn’t know existed. Very curious as to what they came up with. They can let us know any time…preferable within the show!

Some time ago Steven Moffat said : "When a fictional character starts keeping secrets from the writer, that’s when that character becomes real" (look skulls-and-tea quotes collection).  Now I see why he said that so convinced.  They apply this to Sherlock and it really works! If they’re not lying, it seems that is actually the secret of why Sherlock is so real. If they’re not lying, I think they probably did not determine his sexuality and deliberately they thought about him to make him ambiguous before actually have a decision. It’s very interesting from a storytelling PoV, but it’s disappointing from the audience if you think then what are you implying with the all subtext across series 1?

Reblogged from reichen-brook  2,047 notes
avawatson:

I was taking screencaps of TEH (as you do) and cropped this out to show the better shot of the lighting on Sherlock and I just wanted to put it out there at this shot is friggin’ beautiful. Torture notwithstanding. But the lighting of the torturer, the painterly quality of the walls and table and window, the wetness and texture of the stone tile, the line of Mycroft’s body, the stairs up and away. This is gorgeous. Guys, say what you will about Sherlock and maybe TEH specifically but sometimes I’m still overwhelmed by how good this show is.

avawatson:

I was taking screencaps of TEH (as you do) and cropped this out to show the better shot of the lighting on Sherlock and I just wanted to put it out there at this shot is friggin’ beautiful. Torture notwithstanding. But the lighting of the torturer, the painterly quality of the walls and table and window, the wetness and texture of the stone tile, the line of Mycroft’s body, the stairs up and away. This is gorgeous. Guys, say what you will about Sherlock and maybe TEH specifically but sometimes I’m still overwhelmed by how good this show is.

Reblogged from ivyblossom  526 notes

John Watson: Not Gay

ivyblossom:

Sherlock tends to have multiple readings built into it, which is part of the reason why I like it so much, and why I can keep writing about it months (or years) after a series of it has aired. And the question of John’s sexuality fits into that paradigm. We can discuss it for years, because you can read it so many different ways.

John’s refrain of “not gay” makes the question of his sexual orientation open and shut to many people. To me, those scenes, in conjunction with his actions and decisions in the rest of the show, only serve to highlight the fact that John’s attractions are a difficult subject for him, and he feels like he has something to prove (or disprove). It seems to me that it represents an argument he has in his head, and people making assumptions about him and Sherlock fall into his internal debate. 

John flirts with women; he dates women, and practically forgets their names while doing so; he sleeps with women; he marries a woman. Sounds pretty straight.

However.

John Watson develops crushingly intense emotional relationships with men that are so close to being romantic it’s impossible to distinguish with the naked eye. Once might be a fluke, an “exception,” if you will; but we see two of them. For all the women we’ve seen John date, it’s these two men he doesn’t want to shake. He never gets over Sherlock, and his admiration for Sholto is so obvious that it makes Sherlock jealous. 

If it stopped there, we could say that John lives at least on the border of homoromanticism while considering himself a straight man. But it doesn’t stop there.

Read More

Reblogged from watsonbatch  188 notes

Some Beautiful Behind the Scenes pictures of BBC Sherlock, from Radio Times, with lots of information about each pic. (x)

1: “We wanted to blur the edge between laboratory and kitchen,” says Arwel, suggesting Holmes would think nothing of boiling the kettle next to an experiment on a severed hand - or heating up beans on a Bunsen burner.

2: The skull on the mantelpiece is, of course, a cast, which had to be chiselled out to allow Watson to hide Holmes’s packet of cigarettes inside it in The Hounds of Baskerville.

3: The bison sporting earphones is Arwel’s favourite object on the set of 221b. The animal skull was purchased online and sprayed a glossy black before it was mounted on the wall. The headphones were a last-minute, spur-of the moment addition.

4: A modern alternative to the stiletto always referenced as Holmes’s way of filing the mail, this Leatherman knife actually belonged to Arwel. But because it now has a permanent home on set, he’s had to purchase a replacement.

5: In the artwork on the wall, parts of the skull are painted on different layers of Perspex, creating a sort of 3D effect. Even shot in 2D, the depth created and the weirdness of the effect make for an impressive addition to the set.

6: This magpie seal was inspired by the music playing on Moriarty’s headphones (Rossini’s The Thieving Magpie) as he staged his daring break-ins. It also influenced the winged IOU graffiti on a Baker Street wall.

7: Sherlock’s headstone was made by a local stonemason who was sworn to secrecy. Arwel stored it at home and transported it on location, where the scene in the cemetery was shot by a skeleton crew (no pun intended).